Steeds 29

16 05 2017

Sarah asked, “Why do we kill so many animals?”

Lee said, “I presume by ‘we,’ you refer to humans. Why do we human beings kill so many animals?”

“Yes.”

“The short answer is this: humans kill animals for food and fiber.”

“But why? Is it really necessary? And at such a high … how do they say it in war?”

“Casualty count?”

“At such a high cost in casualties, yes.”

“I’ve wondered about that myself sometimes. Perhaps not often enough.”

“How so?” Sarah asked.

“Well, as much as I regard these two horses, you’ve noticed that Freyja and Isolde are both loaded with leather. I wear leather boots and belts. That all came from cows not nearly as well liked. And I like the taste of steak as well as the next man.”

“I like fried chicken. And bacon. Even so, why is that? It wasn’t that way in the beginning.”

“You have in mind the Genesis account.” Lee pulled a book from a saddlebag. “ ‘So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, “Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.” And God said, “Behold, I have given you every herb bearing seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in the which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for meat. And to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, I have given every green herb for meat:” and it was so. And God saw everything that he had made, and, behold, it was very good.’ ”

“That’s it,” said Sarah. “If we were made to eat seeds and fruit and herbs, and if we were commanded to eat seeds and fruit and herbs, why do we eat meat? And why do we have such a taste for meat?”

Lee turned pages. “ ‘And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, “Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth. And the fear of you and the dread of you shall be upon every beast of the earth, and upon every fowl of the air, upon all that moveth upon the earth, and upon all the fishes of the sea; into your hand are they delivered. Every moving thing that liveth shall be meat for you; even as the green herb have I given you all things. But flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat. And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it, and at the hand of man; at the hand of every man’s brother will I require the life of man. Whoso sheddeth man’s blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man. And you, be ye fruitful, and multiply; bring forth abundantly in the earth, and multiply therein.” ’ ”

Lee said, “One might reasonably think that God allowed Noah and his family to slaughter animals for food because, after the Flood, they couldn’t afford the time it would take to plant, tend, and harvest crops; they’d starve. As I think about it, though, they would have had to kill quite a number of the animals they had just saved from the Flood while waiting for crops to harvest … unless there was already enough edible vegetation growing to meet their needs. They did wait months in the ark after it had come to rest in the mountains of Ararat.

Sarah said, “As I think about it, how could they have gathered enough food to store for that many for that long?”

“You have read that God put Adam to sleep when He took Adam’s rib to make Eve. Perhaps God put the animals on the ark to sleep in like manner, and they all went through the Flood in the way bears go through winter.”

“Perhaps.”

“As I think more about it,” Lee continued, “I wonder if humans had not already acquired a taste for meat by the time of, and even long before, the Flood.”

“Oh?”

“It is written that Jabal was the first to live in tents and tend cattle, otherwise known as livestock. Why would a man become a stockman?”

“Probably not just to produce milk, butter, and cheese,” Sarah said.

“So think about it. After the Fall, God cursed the ground and said that Adam would thereafter work by the sweat of his brow: work became drudgery, toil, slog. You’re a farmer. Well, at least you’re a farmer’s daughter. You know how much time and trouble it takes to get food from field to cellar and pantry.”

“I do.”

“Think of this. You’re a man or woman having a hard time of it, harder than usual after the Fall. You’re donkey tired and you’re still hungry, even starving. You see a fox take down a prairie chicken. You see a bobcat take down a rabbit. You see a cougar take down a deer. You see a pack of wolves take down a bison. And you say, ‘That’s ever so much faster, if not easier. Maybe I should try that.’ And you do.

“You might say, ‘But why would people used to eating seeds and fruit and herbs like the taste of meat any more than would a rabbit or deer?’

“What saith the Scripture? ‘Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils; speaking lies in hypocrisy, having their conscience seared with a hot iron…’. The Apostle Paul at the time was speaking of the future, but I suspect the same thing happened leading up to the Flood. How many cuts can a man inflict on his heart and mind before those wounds require cauterizing? How much blood can a man spill before his conscience is seared?

“What did God say? The whole earth was corrupt and full of violence. This after what God had made was good and very good.”

Sarah said, “You think part of that violence was the killing of animals?”

“I wouldn’t preach it from a pulpit, but yes: killing beyond whatever may have been ordained for religious sacrifice. As you may know from family experience, hunting isn’t as easy as wild cats and dogs make it look. It requires skill, patience, and quite often courage.”

“So does farming,” said Sarah.

“True, but that’s so slow. Compared against taking on a boar or a bear, who notices the performance?”

“Is that why predators always get more glory than planters?”

“And if you’re an intrepid hunter who wants still more glory at less cost, well then: take on the farmers. Says the hunter, let husbandmen do all the drudgery, and then prey on them; the dullards can’t defend their crops, their livestock, or themselves even as well as turkeys and geese can defend themselves. And if they try?”

“Violence,” said Sarah. “More and more violence.”

“Lamach bragged that the homicide he committed was worth eleven times what Cain did to Abel. That kind of corruption was more than wicked enough. Add what men did to their fellow, non-human creatures, and you get an earth reeling with violence.

“What saith the Scripture? ‘And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, and the time of the dead, that they should be judged, and that thou shouldest give reward unto thy servants the prophets, and to the saints, and them that fear thy name, small and great; and shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth.’ The Apostle John at the time was speaking of the future, but I again suspect the same thing happened leading up to the Flood: men worked to destroy, not just their fellow man created in the image of God, but the earth and its creatures made by God, too.”

“So why didn’t God destroy only wicked men … and women? Why destroy everything?” Sarah asked.

“I don’t know. One the on hand, God was reluctant to destroy wicked Ninevah in the days of Jonah, not only due to His concern for the people, but also out of concern for their animals. On the other hand, God executed judgment on everything of Sodom and Gomorrah, on everything of Jericho, on everything of Amalek, to include their animals. The answer may lie in this. Wickedness of heart and mind can and will deprave a body. Even so, corporate wickedness of hearts and minds can and will deprave a community and its environment.

“In the days of Noah, the earth needed to be washed clean. And maybe, just maybe, while that was happening, Noah and his family had to care for a number of animals in a manner similar to that which had been the responsibility of Adam and Eve as stewards of the earth given the task to dress and keep. Can it be that Adam and Eve, and all mankind, were intended to care for God’s creatures the way you cared for Daisy, and the way I care for Freyja and Isolde?”

“So,” said Sarah, “after such a cleansing, why not return to the way it was supposed to be?”

“The Devil wasn’t executed. Sin wasn’t destroyed, as Noah himself soon experienced. And the earth wasn’t transformed back into a Garden of Eden. God told people to spread out. At Babel, He coerced them to do so. People then eventually migrated to places all around the planet, to include many places unsuitable for agriculture: deserts, taiga, tundra, mountains. If those people were to survive, if not thrive, they then had to rely on animals for food and fiber.

“And remember: Jesus Himself ate fish. And as a Law-abiding Hebrew, He was at least present at the sacrifices ordained in Leviticus. He also ate the Passover, which included lamb. Indeed, as the eldest son―or perhaps the only son, depending on your religious instruction―in the family after the passing of Joseph, He would have been the one to slay the Passover Lamb. If so, I doubt that He, knowing He would become our Passover sacrificed for us, killed His creatures with the bloodlust of Nimrod.”

Said Sarah, “Maybe that is the attitude we should have at the death of any animal.”

 

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